Schedule and Panels

Our schedule for the day is as follows:
12:00-12:30pm    Welcome Address: SCIPP & Henry Brady, Dean of the Goldman School
12:30-1:30pm     Content Panels: Deepening our Understanding of the Key Issues
1:30-2:30pm      Skills Panels: Bridging the Gap Between Academy and Community
2:30-3:30pm      Keynote Address: Christopher Edley, Dean of Berkeley Law School
3:30-5:00pm      Reception

12:30-1:30 – Content Panels

Race & Politics
We have an African-American president, a Latina on the Supreme Court, and Oakland and San Francisco both have their first Asian-American mayors in history. We are basking in the glow of a post-racial era, right? Or is it more complicated than that? This session will explore the contours of race and how it plays out in the world of politics.

Claudia Albano, UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare
Charles Henry, African American Studies, UC Berkeley
Michael Omi, Ethnic Studies Department, UC Berkeley
Timothy M. Dayonot, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

Labor & Education
The labor movement has yielded significant benefits for minority groups previously forced to accept second-class wages and benefits. The nascent educational equity movement has its eye on the achievement gap between Blacks, Latinos, and their white and Asian peers. Meanwhile, public school teachers’ ability to collectively bargain is under assault. This session will tackle the crossroads of labor and education as it relates to race in the U.S. today.

Chin Martin, National Equity Project
Janelle Scott, School of Education, UC Berkeley
Nicole Sanchez, Former Executive Director of the Berkeley Alliance
Rucker Johnson, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley
Steven Pitts, UC Berkeley Labor Center

Prison & Criminal Justice
Our current “prison-industrial complex” has been labeled as the “new Jim Crow” given the staggering numbers of African-Americans ensnared in the system. Minority groups are vastly over-represented within the ranks of those incarcerated, but the conventional wisdom seems to cite “cultural reasons” as driving our men and women of color into the correctional system. This session will discuss the implications of our nation’s imprisonment of large numbers of its minority population.

Jeanne Woodford, Former Secretary of the California Department of Corrections
Jody Lewen, Prison University Project
Steven Raphael, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley  

Public Health & Environment
People of color are disproportionately impacted by environmental degradation and other resulting public health dangers in low-income communities. How do “chance” and “choice” factor into the health and environmental challenges that these families so often face? What drives the racial health disparities that persist in our country, even across class lines? How do these challenges shape the lives of our families of color?

Amani Nuru-Jeter, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
Carmen Rojas, Mitchell Kapor Foundation
Mahasin Mujahid, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley

1:30-2:30 – Skills Panels

Race Conscious Systems
So many of our current systems for delivering public services operate on antiquated notions about race. We have inherited systems whose outcomes do not always match up with our emerging values around diversity and inclusiveness. This session will discuss how actors within these systems can shift the agenda and begin to reshape and build systems that operate with a race consciousness that serves all parties more equitably.

Amani Nuru-Jeter, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
Jack Glaser, Goldman School of Public Policy
Janelle Scott, School of Education, UC Berkeley
Nicole Sanchez, Former Executive Director of the Berkeley Alliance
Jeanne Woodford, Former Secretary of the California Department of Correction

Intersection of Policy Fields
It is all too easy for policy thinkers to get isolated in their particular fields of expertise. We often fail to connect the dots in policy and we miss the ways in which our work interacts with other fields. This session will help us think more about how joining together various efforts in policy can provide beneficial outcomes for our communities.

Mahasin Mujahid, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
Michael Omi, Ethnic Studies Department, UC Berkeley
Zeus Leonardo, School of Education, UC Berkeley
Charles Henry, African American Studies, UC Berkeley

Ground Level Impact
Much of policy thinking can feel so removed from our communities that need innovative solutions to big problems. In many areas, there is a need to bridge the gap between the academy and our communities. This session will explore how thinkers and practitioners can make a positive and concrete impact in communities of color with a focus on racial equity.

Carmen Rojas, Mitchell Kapor Foundation
Chin Martin, National Equity Project
Jody Lewen, Prison University Project
Steven Pitts, UC Berkeley Labor Center
Steven Raphael, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley
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